The Very Best and Very Worst Of Reddit

Every once in a while, the Safe Braking team puts together a compilation of the very best and very worst brake related content the massive aggregator Reddit has to offer.

Today, we have some amazing gifs, and also some cringe-worthy pictures that will make you question the intelligence of most people.

First up, aw rats! A customer came in complaining of squealing brakes. Although I don’t think it was the brakes that were squealing..

Photo Credit: /u/toneman238

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next, we have an amazing GIF of some highly powerful brakes. Can’t even imagine what was running through that drivers head! (Click to watch)

GIF courtesy of /u/redditblockedmyother

GIF courtesy of /u/redditblockedmyother

 

 

 

 

 

 

Third, is a a classic picture of terrible brake maintenance.  Don’t be the guy who’s car is so bad it made it to Reddit!

Photo Credit: /u/mymommadethisforme

Photo Credit: /u/mymommadethisforme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No caption needed on this last one! (Click to watch)

GIF Courtesy of /u/johnbonhan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We sincerely hope you enjoyed our compilation!

BREAKING: NHTSA Blames Random Winter Brake Failures On Salt

U.S. investigators have spent years trying to figure out why the brakes on thousands of U.S.-made trucks and SUVs were failing without warning. Brake failures were behind at least 107 crashes last year and there is data illustrating that up to two million vehicles could be affected.

Finally, after four years of study, the National Highway Traffic & Safety Administration (NHTSA) says it has finally solved the mystery: Salt.

According to reports, the agency has “strongly” suggested that Americans “thoroughly wash the underside of their vehicles.” Investigators found unexpected brake failure could happen to anyone driving a 2008 and earlier vehicle in a cold-weather state.

In a 2011 NHTSA probe, the agency looked at GM trucks made in 1999-2003 following numerous reports that some of the U.S.’s largest passenger vehicles seemed unusually prone to sudden brake failure. Among the suspects: the Cadillac Escalade, the Chevy Suburban and the GMC Yukon.

Photo Courtesy of  THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Photo Courtesy of THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Investigators responded by sending out surveys, pored over safety records, and inspected 71 randomly selected vehicles — but nothing found warranted a recall/

However. the probe did find that sudden brake line ruptures were not limited to a couple of million GM cars. Instead, they could be a danger to anyone behind the wheel of an older model truck or SUV in one the U.S.’s “salt states.”

“Salt and other chemicals can accumulate on road surfaces, can accumulate on your vehicle’s underbody, and could put you and your passengers in danger,” says a safety video issued Thursday by NHTSA.

The ‘incubation period’ identified by the report was only eight years. By that point, cars driven in “harsh conditions” would have built up enough corrosion to produce extremely dangerous and life-threating structural problems.

If you live in one of the “salt states” and own a vehicle that falls within the period, you could seriously be at risk. The best action to take at the moment would be to follow the Agency’s directions and thoroughly wash the underside of your vehicle. This should be done semiannually to prevent the spread of corrosion.

We will be updating this story as soon as we’ve received more information.

Special Thanks to the National Post and NHTSA

 

 

NHTSA Safety Advisory For Brake Lines: NHTSA Sells Out To Car Washes

rustWell, there will be no recalls on GM vehicles for brake line corrosion. But we do get this nifty advisory form NHTSA. I have some problems with the advice given. First, When the brines are dry they do the least amount of damage. When they are activated by water the oxidation process kicks into high gear. So, if you were to do an undercarriage wash at a car wash (15-20 seconds at the most) it could be activating the brines and salts. Also, most car wash undercarriage washes do not remove all of the corrosive compounds, especially on top of the fuel tank where a lot of ruptures were occurring.

NHTSA Safety Advisory: Preventing Brake Pipe Failure Due to Corrosion in Older Vehicles

ISSUE: Model year 2007 and earlier vehicles may be susceptible to brake pipe corrosion that can occur after seven to eight years of exposure to winter road salts. If brake pipe corrosion is not properly addressed, there is the potential of brake pipe failure which could result in a crash.

Consumer Actions to Protect Against Brake Pipe Corrosion in Older Vehicles

  1. Remove road salt that leads to corrosion:
    • Thoroughly clean your vehicle, including the undercarriage, at the end of the winter
    • Regularly wash the undercarriage throughout the winter.
  2. Monitor your brake system, including brake pipes, and other undercarriage components for corrosion or signs of brake failure:
    • If you own an older vehicle in a cold-weather state, have a qualified mechanic or inspection station inspect the vehicle at least twice a year. If there are any signs of corrosion, inspect the brakes more frequently, at least every time you bring your vehicle in for service.
    • Keep an eye on brake fluid level. Watch for changes in how your brake pedal feels and for signs of fluid leakage beneath the vehicle. All of these could indicate a leak in your brake pipes.
  3. If you find severe corrosion that causes scaling or flaking of brake components (see the photos below), replace the entire brake pipe assembly:
    • Do not replace just a portion of the assembly. Failure in one portion of the brake pipes generally means other sections of pipe are at risk of failure.
    • Check with your manufacturer to see if they have pre-fabricated brake pipe kits to make replacement easier and potentially less expensive.

Background

NHTSA recently conducted an investigation of brake pipe failures due to corrosion in a large population of 1999 through 2003 model year full-size pickup trucks and sport utility vehicles and found that the failures result from end-of-life wear-out. Data show that this corrosion problem is linked to brake line coating materials that several manufacturers used during this time period. Vehicles driven in the following salt states are more prone to corrosion-related issues: Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia, Wisconsin and the District of Columbia.

BRAKING FAQ: Can Brake Fluid Freeze?

NOFreeze Brake Fluid

Technically brake fluid can’t freeze solid like water due to the fact that it is an oil. But it can reach a point where it becomes so thick that it no longer becomes effective at transferring force from the master cylinder to the wheels. The fluid can “gel” or congeal. Base mineral oil has a “working point” of -22C or -30F. But, it will never turn into a solid.

Additives to the base oil can push the limit to -45F or lower. It the temperatures go lower chances are the pedal will be stiff, but not frozen. After a few stops, the heat of the brakes would warm the fluid. If you are driving in temperatures below -50F, you have a lot more problems than the brake fluid like engine oil and coolant.

Theoretically, the ABS pump on some vehicles could have problems if it activate and the brake fluid was thick enough. This could introduce air bubbles into the brake fluid. Also, since brake fluid is hydroscopic (absorbs water), the additional water can influence the viscosity at lower temperatures.

No, DOT 3,4 and 5.1 brake fluid will not freeze preventing you from stopping altogether. Chances are if you have experiences a hard brake pedal in the winter, it is condensation in the brake booster or vacuum supply hose that has frozen.

STUFF WE LIKE: Brake Shot Brake Fluid Rejuvenator

Phoenix Systems BrakeShot is like 5-Hour Energy for brake hydraulics. It is a brake fluid enhancer designed to fight corrosion induced by the harmful effects of copper.

BrakeShot uses DOT guidelines and is specifically formulated to retard copper corrosion in the braking system. BrakeShot prevents sticking calipers, ailing master cylinders, and other ABS braking troubles brought about by corrosion and high copper levels, in the brake system.

To determine if BrakeShot can cure a contaminated system, use BrakeStrip to determine the copper parts per million (ppm) in the brake fluid. BrakeStrip is a 60-second brake fluid test that turns shades of purple according to the level of copper in the braking system.

If the strip indicates a copper level of between 50-175ppm, simply add a one-ounce bottle of BrakeShot to the master cylinder. After 50-100 miles of driving, BrakeShot will re-energize the corrosion inhibitors to protect all the metals in the entire brake system and prevent further corrosion. If, however, the test strip indicates 200ppm or greater, the brake system requires flushing and the fluid replaced.

With multiple patents pending a one-ounce shot of BrakeShot treats up to 1 liter of brake fluid, which is the average capacity of a vehicle’s braking system. Cheaper and quicker than a brake flush, BrakeShot is universal and works on all foreign and domestic vehicles. Packaged in a case of 12, each bottle retails for $15-$20.

MORE INFORMATION