The Very Best and Very Worst Of Reddit

Every once in a while, the Safe Braking team puts together a compilation of the very best and very worst brake related content the massive aggregator Reddit has to offer.

Today, we have some amazing gifs, and also some cringe-worthy pictures that will make you question the intelligence of most people.

First up, aw rats! A customer came in complaining of squealing brakes. Although I don’t think it was the brakes that were squealing..

Photo Credit: /u/toneman238

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next, we have an amazing GIF of some highly powerful brakes. Can’t even imagine what was running through that drivers head! (Click to watch)

GIF courtesy of /u/redditblockedmyother

GIF courtesy of /u/redditblockedmyother

 

 

 

 

 

 

Third, is a a classic picture of terrible brake maintenance.  Don’t be the guy who’s car is so bad it made it to Reddit!

Photo Credit: /u/mymommadethisforme

Photo Credit: /u/mymommadethisforme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No caption needed on this last one! (Click to watch)

GIF Courtesy of /u/johnbonhan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We sincerely hope you enjoyed our compilation!

BREAKING: NHTSA Blames Random Winter Brake Failures On Salt

U.S. investigators have spent years trying to figure out why the brakes on thousands of U.S.-made trucks and SUVs were failing without warning. Brake failures were behind at least 107 crashes last year and there is data illustrating that up to two million vehicles could be affected.

Finally, after four years of study, the National Highway Traffic & Safety Administration (NHTSA) says it has finally solved the mystery: Salt.

According to reports, the agency has “strongly” suggested that Americans “thoroughly wash the underside of their vehicles.” Investigators found unexpected brake failure could happen to anyone driving a 2008 and earlier vehicle in a cold-weather state.

In a 2011 NHTSA probe, the agency looked at GM trucks made in 1999-2003 following numerous reports that some of the U.S.’s largest passenger vehicles seemed unusually prone to sudden brake failure. Among the suspects: the Cadillac Escalade, the Chevy Suburban and the GMC Yukon.

Photo Courtesy of  THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Photo Courtesy of THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Investigators responded by sending out surveys, pored over safety records, and inspected 71 randomly selected vehicles — but nothing found warranted a recall/

However. the probe did find that sudden brake line ruptures were not limited to a couple of million GM cars. Instead, they could be a danger to anyone behind the wheel of an older model truck or SUV in one the U.S.’s “salt states.”

“Salt and other chemicals can accumulate on road surfaces, can accumulate on your vehicle’s underbody, and could put you and your passengers in danger,” says a safety video issued Thursday by NHTSA.

The ‘incubation period’ identified by the report was only eight years. By that point, cars driven in “harsh conditions” would have built up enough corrosion to produce extremely dangerous and life-threating structural problems.

If you live in one of the “salt states” and own a vehicle that falls within the period, you could seriously be at risk. The best action to take at the moment would be to follow the Agency’s directions and thoroughly wash the underside of your vehicle. This should be done semiannually to prevent the spread of corrosion.

We will be updating this story as soon as we’ve received more information.

Special Thanks to the National Post and NHTSA

 

 

Taxi Driver Saves Self, Kills Two in Brake Failure Crash

Two people were killed and eleven were injured this past Saturday in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa following a gruesomely selfish brake failure crash.

News 24 reported that the driver had leapt from his seat to save himself as the vehicle slammed through a roadside barrier and ultimately plunged down an embankment, literally flinging passengers out of the vehicle as it rolled.

First responders and firefighters were said to have set up a rope rescue system at the top of the embankment to help medics carry the injured to waiting ambulances.

Currently, there is no additional information regarding the status of the injured or the criminal proceedings regarding the driver of the taxi.

The same type of taxi involved in the crash. Photo by Duncan Alfreds

 

 

Taxi Driver Goes For A Swim Following Brake Failure

A taxi driver in Massachussets is thanking his lucking stars after being spared during an untimely brake failure crash while on duty last night.

According to reports, it was about 3am when the 27 year-old driver suddenly experienced a loss of pressure beneath his brake pad. The event happened so quickly that the driver was unable to respond with evasive action in time so the vehicle careened down a few flight of stairs and came to rest at the bottom of the Severn river.

Fortunately, the cabbie was uninjured in the incident and walked away from the scene.

The taxi has now been recovered but marks, believed to have been caused by the rescue operation, are still visible on steps leading to the water.

West Mercia Police officers posted the picture on social media, joking “Worcester welcomes its first water taxi – the launch didn’t go too well.”

BRAKING FAQ: Can Brake Fluid Freeze?

NOFreeze Brake Fluid

Technically brake fluid can’t freeze solid like water due to the fact that it is an oil. But it can reach a point where it becomes so thick that it no longer becomes effective at transferring force from the master cylinder to the wheels. The fluid can “gel” or congeal. Base mineral oil has a “working point” of -22C or -30F. But, it will never turn into a solid.

Additives to the base oil can push the limit to -45F or lower. It the temperatures go lower chances are the pedal will be stiff, but not frozen. After a few stops, the heat of the brakes would warm the fluid. If you are driving in temperatures below -50F, you have a lot more problems than the brake fluid like engine oil and coolant.

Theoretically, the ABS pump on some vehicles could have problems if it activate and the brake fluid was thick enough. This could introduce air bubbles into the brake fluid. Also, since brake fluid is hydroscopic (absorbs water), the additional water can influence the viscosity at lower temperatures.

No, DOT 3,4 and 5.1 brake fluid will not freeze preventing you from stopping altogether. Chances are if you have experiences a hard brake pedal in the winter, it is condensation in the brake booster or vacuum supply hose that has frozen.